Cardiovascular Operations

Cardiovascular Operations

Robotic Mitral Valve Surgery (by Dr. Aubrey Almeida)
The mitral valve is the "in-flow valve" for the left side of the heart. Blood flows from the lungs, where it picks up oxygen, enters the left atrium and then passes through the mitral valve. When it opens, the mitral valve allows blood to flow into the heart''s main pumping chamber called the left ventricle. It then closes to prevent blood from leaking back into the left atrium when the ventricle contracts (squeezes) to push blood out to the body. Occasionally, the mitral valve is abnormal from birth. More often, the mitral valve becomes abnormal with age or as a result of rheumatic fever.

Ross Procedure (by Dr. Peter Skillington)
With this operation the aortic valve is replaced with the patient’s own pulmonary valve, which is in turn replaced with a human pulmonary valve (allograft or homograft). The advantage of this procedure is that the aortic valve replacement is the patient’s own tissue, which is viable, and has the potential to last 40 years plus ie a lifetime for many patients.

David’s Reimplantation Procedure (by Dr. George Matalanis)
Enlargement of the aorta (aortic aneurysm), particularly the aortic root (the junction of the aorta with the heart) and the ascending aorta (the segment of aorta immediately above the heart and lying in the front of the chest behind the breast bone), can disturb the delicate support of the aortic valve (the valve guarding exit of blood from the heart into the aorta). This distortion of the aortic valve can result in valve malfunction, especially leakage from the valve (called aortic regurgitation or aortic incompetence.

Surgical Management of Aortic Valve and Root Disease
(by Associate Professor Richard Chard)
The Aortic root is the part of the Aorta that is attached to the heart. It includes a tough fibrous ring called the “annulus” and the three leaflets of the Aortic valve. It also includes the openings where the coronary arteries (arteries supplying the heart) attach to - these are called the “Coronary Ostia”